Bikepacking The Globe Solo

Processing a period of depression and raising money for charity

Feature type Video

Published Dec 19, 2022

Base editorial team
BASE editorial team BASE writers and editors who live and breathe adventure every day. We love adventure storytelling as much as we love adventure itself.

A big extended adventure is something many of us will have dreamt about, but few get the opportunity to take on something so large. For Boru McCullagh, bikepacking around the world is fulfilling a lifetime dream. The reality of spending so much time alone though for many will prove tough. So why ride your bike solo 34,000km+ around the world? Boru presses pause on his day to day life in order to fulfil his desire to explore new landscapes and cultures by bike and to process a past depression that dominated his life for many years. In doing so he raises money and awareness for Mental Health through MIND.

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