Hyperborea

Off-piste skiing in Arctic Norway

Feature type Story

Read time 5 min read

Published Aug 05, 2020

Author Hamish Frost

Photographer Hamish Frost

Hamish Frost
Hamish Frost Mountain sports photographer based in Scotland. In his element during the depths of winter, he has an unusual appetite for cold, wet and challenging conditions, capturing images of people testing themselves in mountain environments.

Photography | Hamish Frost

Fabian Linge taking some big air off a small rock outcrop with the awe-inspiring Lofoten Island skyline in the background. Skiing from summit-to-sea is a frequent possibility in Arctic Norway.

Fabian Linge taking some big air off a small rock outcrop with the awe-inspiring Lofoten Island skyline in the background. Skiing from summit-to-sea is a frequent possibility in Arctic Norway.

Hyperborea was a mythical realm of giants who the ancient Greeks believed lived ‘beyond the north wind’. The mountains of Arctic Norway are perhaps the real-world version. Between November and May, skiing here offers a superb combination of stunning scenery, wild mountainous terrain, steep summit-to-sea descents, and the potential for sightings of the northern lights after a long day’s touring. The most popular areas include the Lyngen Alps (just east of Tromsø) and the Lofoten Islands (just west of Narvik) in part due to their relative accessibility. However, there are mountain ranges of equal stature outside these areas for those who would prefer to venture further off the beaten track. Whatever the precise nature of your trip, experiencing Arctic Norway should be on the bucket list for every competent off-piste skier.

Al Todd beginning the 900m descent down the south face of Himmeltindan on the stunning island of Vestvågøya in the heart of the Lofoten Islands.

Al Todd beginning the 900m descent down the south face of Himmeltindan on the stunning island of Vestvågøya in the heart of the Lofoten Islands.

Hyperborea was a mythical realm of giants who the ancient Greeks believed lived ‘beyond the north wind’.

The view south to the Norwegian mainland from the Lofoten Islands

The view south to the Norwegian mainland from the Lofoten Islands

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